General Technical Information

WHICH RESIN ??
EPOXY vs. POLYESTER vs. VINYLESTER

Beware of the "one size fits all" approach.

More than 95% of all boats, truck & car bodies made of fiberglass are made primarily of E-glass,
orthothalic polyester resin and isothalic polyester gelcoat.  Items constructed with these materials
should be repaired with the same or compatible material.  LBI's 301 Orthothalic Polyester Resin is a
good choice for most repairs.  It provides a chemical bond to the existing laminate with similar
strength & flexural characteristics.

Orthothalic polyester, isothalic polyester and vinylester resins are compatible, they all have styrene
(commonly known as the "fiberglass smell") and chemically bond to one another.

If higher strength, bond and water resistance are required (such as keel, rudder repair, or outboard
transcom replacement) use LBI's 302 Isothalic Polyester Resin.

For the highest bond strength, bond strength and water resistance use LBI's 901 Vinylester Resin. 

Vinylester is essentially a styrene modified epoxy resin.  It gives excellent strength, rigidity, adhesion,
water and chemical resistance.

Keep in mind...

* Epoxy adheres to wood much better than polyester does.  To cover wood, a laminate using
  epoxy resin and 10 oz. cloth will yield a much better job than 10 oz. cloth and polyester resin.
  The epoxy / cloth laminate is comparable to using polyester resin with 3/4 oz. mat and 10 oz. cloth.
  However, the epoxy laminate requires much less labor to fair.

* A polyester laminate job is somewhat less expensive in material costs than an epoxy laminate
  project of the same size.

Remember...

* Fiberglass mat cannot be used with epoxy because the binding material in the mat will NOT
  dissolve in epoxy resin.

* Either mat, cloth or woven roving may be used with polyester resin.

* Since mat sticks much better to wood than cloth does, always make mat your first layer against the
  wood to be covered in a polyester laminate project.  

* We recommend using a layer of mat between layers of cloth for maximum adhesion between layers.

PREPARATION FOR COVERING WOOD WITH FIBERGLASS AND POLYESTER OR EPOXY

NOTE:  If working with old wood, remove all paint and foreign material from surface.

Step 1:  Sand surface with 60 or 80 grit samdpaper to rough-up surface.

Step 2:  Brush or roll on a primer / saturation coat of catalyzed polyester resin thinned 25% with
                acetone or styrene.  Epoxy resin should be thinned 25% with 1271 Epoxy Solvent.
               
                (Use either polyester or epoxy for a job.  Never mix the two together).

Step 3:  Sand lightly with 60 or 80 grit sandpaper to de-burr the surface.  Be very careful not to sand
                through the primer / saturation coat.

Step 4:  You are now ready to proceed with the lay-up method you've chosen.

OTHER HELPFUL HINTS

* No laminating project should be started without having a solvent handy for clean up.  Use acetone
  with polyester resin and 1271 Epoxy Solvent with epoxy resin.

* Keeping mixed resins, particularly epoxies in a wide, shallow pan, such as a roller pan, will
  increase the pot life.  This allows the mixture to shed heat and prevents an accelerated reaction.

* Use caution when laying-up glass in direct sunlight because it can greatly decrease working time.

* Remove air bubbles and wrinkles from uncured laminate by using an aluminum or nylon air bubble
  roller.  The air is driven from the uncured laminate into the fins of the roller thus yielding an even,
  bubble free surface.

* Our epoxies, as with most all epoxies, require 5 to 7 days at 70 F to achieve full cure.

SAFETY AND HANDLING

* Keep all resins, hardware and solvents out of the reach of children.

* Always work in well-ventilated areas.

* Safety goggles, gloves and respirators should always be worn when handling resins, hardeners
  and solvents.

* Harmful if swallowed - consult a physician immediately.

* If polyester or epoxy resins or hardeners should splash in your eyes, rinse eyes repeatedly water
  and call a physician immediately.

* Never use or store resins, solvents or hardeners near open flame.  Do not smoke when working with
  these materials.

* We strongly recommend that an organic vapor respirator be worn when using polyester or epoxy
  resin.  However, it is mandatory to wear a respirator when working inside a mold or in confined
  areas, even though good general ventilation is provided.

* Dust masks and safety goggles should always be worn when grinding or sanding cured fiberglass
  laminate.

* Uncured resin spills should be absorbed material.  The surface can then be cleaned immediately with
  hot water and detergent.

* A clean, neat, well-organized work area is generally a safe work area.


FIGURING HOW MUCH RESIN AND GLASS YOU NEED

Use the following Resin Chart as a rule of thumb guideline to determine resin coverage.
Resin to glass usage for polyester and epoxy are very similar.

1 Gallon of Resin Wets Out:
 MATERIAL                     SQUARE FEET
 .75 oz mat   64 
1.50 oz mat   32
3.50 oz cloth  150
6 oz cloth   90 
10 oz cloth   60
13 oz unidirection  26
1708 biaxial   27
18 oz woven roving   40
1808 biaxial   26
24 oz woven roving   32
2415 bi-ply   16





















(50" wide material = approx. 12 sq. ft per liner yard)

Example for figuring amount of fiberglass needed...

Mr. Smith wants to put an epoxy and glass covering of 1 layer of 10oz. cloth and 1101/2102 epoxy on
a cabin top of his boat.  The cabin top is 9 ft. wide by 10ft. long.  The total area to be glassed is 90 sq.ft.
The cabin top width is 108 inches.   Using 38 inch cloth, Mr. Smith needs three 10 ft. pieces.
(108 in. 38 in. cloth = 21.84 or 3 pieces).

Always consider the width of the cloth plus an overlap allowance at the seams.  (We recommend
overlapping all seams 1 to 4 inches).  Since Mr. Smith will be using 90 sq. ft. (three 10 ft. x 38 in. pieces)
of material, he should refer to the resin chart to determine the amount of resin he will need.  In this
example, Mr. Smith will need one and one half (1 1/2) gallons of resin to cover the cabin top of his boat.


Catalyst Range:

Catalyst Usage for 301, 301W, 302, 303 & 305 (Polyester), and 901 (Vinylester) Resin


301 Polyester & 302 ISO
5-15cc 321 MEKP per qt. resin

901 & H1297P Vinylester
10-30cc 391 MEKP per qt. resin

* In cool weather (55-60
F) catalyze 301 & 302 in the mid to high range (10-15cc) & H197P (20-30cc)

* In hot weather (75-90
F) catalyze 301 & 302 in the low to mid range (5-10cc) and 901 & H197P (10-20cc)

* REMEMBER THE MORE CATALYST YOU USE AT A GIVEN TEMPERATURE THE FASTER THE CURE!

* NEVER CATALIZE BELOW THE MINIMAL RECOMMENDED QUANTITY!

* BE ORGANIZED AND HAVE ALL YOUR TOOLS AND SUPPLIES READY!  ONCE CATALYZED, 
  RESIN WAITS FOR NO ONE!


COMMONLY USED TERMS

Cure Time-   The amount of time required for a catalyzed resin to reach approximately 
                       95% of its ultimate strength.  Full cure may take up to 7 days, at 70
F.

Fair-  To fill and sand an irregular surface to make it smooth and even.

Fiberglass-  A reinforcing material comprised of fine glass fibers.

Hardener (Catalyst)-   A substance which when added to resin in the proper proportions
                                        causes the resin to cure and turn from a liquid to a solid.

Laminate-  The process of saturating layers of fiberglass fabric with resin;  a properly saturated layer 
                     of reinforcing material. 
                  
Lay-up-  The process of applying layers of fiberglass fabric and resin in a mold or on a surface, i.e. a
                 deck; laminating. 

Pot Life-  The amount of time from mixing the catalyst into the resin until it begins to gel in the
                  container.

Self Leveling-  When poured onto a horizontal surface liquid flows out flat, similar to oil.

Thixotropic Powder-  A powder which, when added to a liquid such a resin, creates a non-sagging, 
                                         non-running liquid with characteristics similar to those of latex paint.





sales@lbifiberglass.com


 
   





800-231-6537